Dodge Durango Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I found out a couple months ago that I will be moving North for the next three years to one of the few places I can get stationed where it snows for more than a week or two a year. Specifically I will be moving to the Springfield area of Missouri, which isn't really all that far North compared to some of you guys, but I'm from South Texas and never had to deal with snow and ice much. My truck will be fine since it is 4wd with a limited slip rear and it has KO2s which are snowflake rated. I already know they do well in moderate snow from experience.

My concern is the Durango which is 2wd with an open differential as opposed to a Sure-Grip. Now we did get 6" of snow here last year and my wife was able to handle it just fine with the stock Forteras going to and from work-about 10 miles each way, but they are starting to wear and I don't think sticking with those tires will make for a tenable situation for 3 winters that are as long as we will see in central MO.

I know some say that all terrains only make sense on 4wds, but IMHO it is 2wds that need the additional traction more since they don't have as much help from the driveline. Like diesel trucks that get stuck in wet grass on stock tires, its not the 4wds, its the 2wds, and they don't get stuck anymore with better tires.

Anyway, the Durango is almost paid off, and has been a great fit for our needs. We have done a fair amount of off pavement driving and the 2wd has never limited us, and we appreciate the extra fuel efficiency and tighter turning radius the RWD offers over AWD, and also the more power to the wheels from less drivetrain loss. It sees mostly highway and around town driving. With the additional weight in the back I think the Durango will do better than a 2wd pickup and I'm not really sure that we will be in an area that warrants actual snow tires-i'd prefer not to switch tires seasonally if I don't have to. We will be in a rural area so I am thinking that an A/T would be a good fit. That said, if its really not getting the job done after this winter we are open to the possibility of trading to an AWD (which would probably be a Hemi). I don't have a problem leaving early for work and driving a little slower and so far my wife doesn't have a job yet at our destination.

Does anyone have any experience with the Kumho Crugen Premium? I see they are severe snow rated and a highway tire.

Or the Nitto Terra Grappler? I know a few guys who have been happy with these on their trucks.

We do want to stay with the stock 265/50/20 size.

Thanks in advance for any insight, I know some of my assumptions may be off base due to lack of experience in these conditions.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,718 Posts
well, if you're serious..
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Bridgestone&tireModel=Blizzak+DM-V2&partnum=65TR0DMV2&vehicleSearch=true&fromCompare1=yes&autoMake=Dodge&autoYear=2015&autoModel=Durango RWD&autoModClar=SXT&cameFrom=WinterSection

winter only..

more important is to go out in the first snow and learn how to drive in the snow.
- go slow.
- leave lots of room.
- learn how your vehicle behaves on slick roads.
- assume everyone else does not know how to drive in the snow.
- don't drive when it is bad out.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,718 Posts
Also, driving in winter weather is 20% vehicle 80% driver.
In spite of what you see in the car ads on teevee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,173 Posts
I'm with Tom, snow tires all the way! Put snows on the Durango and was very impressed with how well it did!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I live in Rural Quebec, Canada.

I learned a long time ago that if you are serious about driving in winter time on back country roads where the plow doesn't visit often, there is no substitute for good, well gripped winter ONLY rubber.

If you're on icy roads all the time, studded tires are your best friend.

Nokian's Hakkapelitta 9 Studded gets my vote for winter time driving.

Some stats as to the averages where I live, just to give you an idea.

Average daily temperature in winter -> -15 C / 5 F
Average Monthly snowfall in winter -> 60 cm / 24 inches
Average Monthly Rainfall in winter -> 30 mm / 1 1/4 inch

That being said, regardless of your cars traction/drivetrain or the rubbers you put on. It's exactly as Tomk said:

- go slow.
- leave lots of room.
- learn how your vehicle behaves on slick roads.
- assume everyone else does not know how to drive in the snow.
- don't drive when it is bad out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,281 Posts
I'm running the Kumho Crugen Premium tires...now have 10K on them.

Compared to Goodyear Fortera's;

PROS;
Quiet
Smooth ride
Excellent dry and wet handling, braking.
XL rated

CONS;
7 lbs. ea. heavier than GY Fortera's
A solid 1+ mpg hit on city driving due to increased rotational weight.
No noticeable mpg hit on steady highway speeds.
Long term wear not defined. GY's lasted 60K for me.

On snow, only 1 experience here in Atlanta...about 4" of slush, but they did very well and got our D up or steep driveway which I thought would not happen.
Note; Tire Rack tested them in the snow and while they stop fine, handling not very well...not that you would slalom your D, but note if you had to do an emergency maneuver its worth noting Michelin Premier did best in their tests for all-season tire. However, the Crugen Premier rated 2nd overall behind the Michelin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,124 Posts
I see plenty of snowy roads and there's some good advice above. The stock tires are not good in snow when half worn. Have a pair of tires for winter and another for summer. AT tires can be noisy and not as good handling. If that's not a concern, go for it. I've had a great experience with Nitto AT and MT tires. Just haven't put any on my durango.
The only thing I don't entirely agree with here is avoiding driving in poor conditions. Don't avoid the snow, drive in it and learn to love it!. Go find some back lots and slide around so you know exactly how to handle your ride if you accidentally end up in a slide. Get a sense of what the limit are and where you're just not comfortable anymore or likely to end up stuck. I've taught people to drive and am now teaching my oldest daughter. My wife and I have totally different philosophies. She avoids snow as much as humanly possible and is not comfortable driving in it. I've watched her get in a slide and panic, making poor decisions. But she won't take my advice. I take my daughter driving in the rain, fog, snow etc. That's when you learn the most. Just my opinion though. When it snows out, I make excuses to go play in it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
I'm in agreement with some above about running true snow tires. On a 2wd without posi it's the only way to go to truly have good reliable winter traction.

I'm not a big fan of A/T tires for your purpose, while some are decent in snow they really don't solve the problem and just add road noise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys, to clarify if its real bad out and I need to get somewhere I have my truck with 4x4 and LSD. I just don't want to be unable to use the Durango during the Winter, and when my wife finds a job she will need to be able to manage a short commute through town
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
Thanks guys, to clarify if its real bad out and I need to get somewhere I have my truck with 4x4 and LSD. I just don't want to be unable to use the Durango during the Winter, and when my wife finds a job she will need to be able to manage a short commute through town
Understood. As a bit of a comparison, not of vehicles but of winter capability, my wife drives a Town & Country. She had complained about winter traction, the usual issue of new all seasons are OK, 1/2 worn all seasons are useless, and she is a good driver. I advised her to put on snows, yes it's a hassle to swap them twice a year but seemed like it was time. After a few storms she was raving about the difference, she could go anywhere with confidence, no more spinning wheels to get going, really made a huge difference. Snow tires really do work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yeah I used snow tires when I was in Norway. Up there they actually use gravel and sand instead of salt since it digs in and actually adds traction; salt only lowers the freezing point by about 13 degrees so it gets cold enough that even salted roads would freeze.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top