Dodge Durango Forum banner

41 - 60 of 75 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I just had my wife’s DDSRT front brakes, specifically the from rotors and pads replaced as they were finished at 28,000km. I was a little surprised, but after doing a little research, I found out it’s about right.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
the logic is to keep the wheel hub/bearing cooler....less stress on the bearings .. and the rotor with proper vanning or internal venting also sheds heat faster....think pinwheel.....the aluminum hub insulates the bearing and also reduces unsprung weight..which is nice...
Yes!, and in addition to the above, the best reason for two piece rotors is to prevent rotor distortion (cupping or bowing of the plate).
The stresses associated with a rotor’s friction area expanding from repeated localized rapid (or extreme) heat soaking fighting against the more dimensionally stable material in the more thermally isolated hat can (and does) cause one piece rotor material cracking ... which at speed results in sudden and violent unscheduled component disassembly events!

An interesting solution to this brake rotor stress warping phenomenon I first observed mounted on certain OEM BMW models (Z3M?) twenty years ago. They incorporate 8 or 10 ground steel dowel pins cast in a radial pattern between the separately cast friction plate and the hat, brilliant manufacturing idea, except that the whole assy must be replaced when the rotor is worn.
I’ve been using field serviceable, bolt-on, two piece rotors on my performance cars since the early 80s, converting up from the often whimpy OEM brakes to 12” Winston Cup series sourced parts for these heavy muscle cars.
As a machinist, I had to make my own caliper adaptor brackets, hats and spacers, hubs and modified spindles.
Today you can buy a bolt-on “Big-Brake Kit” for just about any car you might own!
The important bits, like the special 72 fin Martinsville rotor discs, 4X2” (or differential bore) AP, or JFZ monoblock calipers have always been readily available and reasonably affordable through racing parts supply houses.
On my 96 SS Impala I put (then current) Z06 fixed F-6 & R-4 pot mono block calipers with DBA Kangaroo Paw rotors @ all four corners, a huge improvement over the OEM 4-wheel disc junk, ~ (check out KORE3 brake kits!).

For my 2020 SRT DD, I bought Diversified Cryogenics’s Frozen Rotors, which are actually Akebono rotors cryo-soak treated for several days, they don’t look different after treatment but I can assure you these rotors are far more stable and resistant to wear, blotchy surface hardening (hot-spots) and plate warping. These cryo rotors perform better, and return a much extended lifespan compared to the same non-cryo-treated parts. I used to use EBC Yellow pads, but now I prefer Hawk HPS, or sd/hp+ pads for daily driving, great grip, low dust, easy on rotors.
The OEM Brembos, as you all know, make crazy dust and the rotor surface always looks dark, streaked, mottled and shredded, they don’t last very long under OEM Brembo pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Yes!, and in addition to the above, the best reason for two piece rotors is to prevent rotor distortion (cupping or bowing of the plate).
The stresses associated with a rotor’s friction area expanding from repeated localized rapid (or extreme) heat soaking fighting against the more dimensionally stable material in the more thermally isolated hat can (and does) cause one piece rotor material cracking ... which at speed results in sudden and violent unscheduled component disassembly events!

An interesting solution to this brake rotor stress warping phenomenon I first observed mounted on certain OEM BMW models (Z3M?) twenty years ago. They incorporate 8 or 10 ground steel dowel pins cast in a radial pattern between the separately cast friction plate and the hat, brilliant manufacturing idea, except that the whole assy must be replaced when the rotor is worn.
I’ve been using field serviceable, bolt-on, two piece rotors on my performance cars since the early 80s, converting up from the often whimpy OEM brakes to 12” Winston Cup series sourced parts for these heavy muscle cars.
As a machinist, I had to make my own caliper adaptor brackets, hats and spacers, hubs and modified spindles.
Today you can buy a bolt-on “Big-Brake Kit” for just about any car you might own!
The important bits, like the special 72 fin Martinsville rotor discs, 4X2” (or differential bore) AP, or JFZ monoblock calipers have always been readily available and reasonably affordable through racing parts supply houses.
On my 96 SS Impala I put (then current) Z06 fixed F-6 & R-4 pot mono block calipers with DBA Kangaroo Paw rotors @ all four corners, a huge improvement over the OEM 4-wheel disc junk, ~ (check out KORE3 brake kits!).

For my 2020 SRT DD, I bought Diversified Cryogenics’s Frozen Rotors, which are actually Akebono rotors cryo-soak treated for several days, they don’t look different after treatment but I can assure you these rotors are far more stable and resistant to wear, blotchy surface hardening (hot-spots) and plate warping. These cryo rotors perform better, and return a much extended lifespan compared to the same non-cryo-treated parts. I used to use EBC Yellow pads, but now I prefer Hawk sd/hp+ pads for daily driving, great grip, low dust, easy on rotors.
The OEM Brembos, as you all know, make crazy dust and the rotor surface always looks dark, streaked, mottled and shredded, they don’t last very long under OEM Brembo pads.
What's the website to the rotors and brakes you use for your DDSRT?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Everyone has their own expectations for what their brakes should deliver.

I have a lot of vehicles that sit outside for long periods, so resistance to surface rust is a good thing.
I want rotors to last a long time thru light and heavy use, I require a predictable grip response when cold or hot, I prefer them to be quiet, free from pulsing, low dust that wipes easily from the wheels, I don’t mind if the pads don’t last forever as long as I get all the other benefits.

The frozen rotors are very good, and are very resistant to crazing, cracking, warping, rusting, the cryo process pays for itself in my experience. But, They may not be exactly what is best for every person, it’s up to you to decide what characteristics are most important to you, because you’re going to spend a little extra money for these rotors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
All good info here, thanks all. The more I read about brake pads the more I realize they are about the same as tires when it comes to wearable items and subjective opinions! I don't mind the brake dust nor replacing pads often. I drive this DSRT hard and want performance but I don't think we need to be spending nearly $600 on performance pads. I'm researching this forum and the GC SRT8 forum, and have also reached out to Brembo, EBC, and Hawk. Hopefully their customer service reps are knowledgeable or can get me to some product managers or engineers with some unbiased info. Either way Ill be needing some pads soon and will share my experience with the pads I decide on. Any recommendations welcome!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
Often manufacturers will not disclose the actual model# of the brembo caliper used. When I have "gone off the reservation" with pads I had to trace out the current oem pad and send to the after market vendor to match...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Hey,

History lesson is not required but suffice to say that I have experience with the OEM replacement costs as well as my Powerstop Z26.

I know that 'cost' is not necessarily at the top of our list when owning this vehicle but having said that I was able to do the whole car, front and rear, rotors and pads for less than it was for me to replace the fronts with OEM. I am 97% happy with them. Happy enough that I would replace with the same again. The rotors look better as well so curb appeal goes up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I ordered this SRT with 3-season tires, upgraded wheels & two piece rotors. When I drove it home, (8 miles!) all 4 wheels looked as though they were salvaged from a really bad garage fire. Black soot everywhere, so I removed the wheels and cleaned everything with Sonax. Then I drove it to work one day, (50 miles) and upon returning home, found an even worse soot problem, so I purchased another full set of forged 10x20s (same style) sent them out to be stripped and PVD coated with a smoked chrome metal vapor deposition process, NOT real chrome though, thankfully. Ordered the Akebono rotors with cryo treatment and low dust Hawk HPS pads and after about 150 miles on each, there is only one major difference, dust. Before the switch, I had to clean the entire wheel package once or twice per week to keep it from looking like a fire salvage sale vehicle. I switched over to Flash Brown Royal wheel cleaner, as it worked just as well as Sonax on new wheels but for much less money.

Until I figure out what to do with them, I’ve got stored in the shed, my OEM upgraded forged matte black wheels with Pirelli run flat summer tires, all original 2-piece Brembo rotors and Brembo pads, with those contemptible OEM lugnuts.
Now I’ve got four very nice 295/40R20 Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ tires, McGard toughnuts and cryo brakes. Smooth linear brake modulation, no vibrations at speed, no pulsing, and after using cryo-ed rotors so often for 25 yrs, I’ve come to trust and rely on them for all manor of street use, including some extremely spirited driving, but of course this is NOT a racing car. If it were, I’d be looking at calipers like Alcon XR6 that are far, FAR superior, with advanced heat management tech, rebuildable pad wear abutment plates, hard coat anodized etc, but to keep it real, it’s only a rather nice pleasure vehicle, it’s not competing for seasonal championship points.

I’m not going to delude myself into thinking that this SRT Durango is the primary tool of a high-bucks racing venture. The whole point of driving over 60 brand new vehicles in the last year while researching the best choice for my needs, was to keep things in balanced perspective. After a lifetime of building, maintaining, testing and driving competition cars, boats, bikes, trucks, etc, I knew I did not want to suffer that reality for my choice in a weekend pleasure vehicle.

Note: when swapping rotors and installing Hawk HPS pads on an SRT DD with the OEM Brembo calipers, you will need a 3/16” drift punch, an E-20 female torx socket for the front caliper bolts, an M18 6 point socket for the rear, and be aware that the rear pads have no wear indicator tabs (squeelers), and all four front pads have them, so you will have to remove two squeelers with pliers to get the inboard pads fully nested in place. I recommend cleaning off the old anti seize from the abutment surfaces and re-coating with a dab of ultra high temp copper anti seize compound. Also, the front pad spring clips can be installed upside down if you disregard the arrow stamped on it. Ask me how I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I ordered this SRT with 3-season tires, upgraded wheels & two piece rotors. When I drove it home, (8 miles!) all 4 wheels looked as though they were salvaged from a really bad garage fire. Black soot everywhere, so I removed the wheels and cleaned everything with Sonax. Then I drove it to work one day, (50 miles) and upon returning home, found an even worse soot problem, so I purchased another full set of forged 10x20s (same style) sent them out to be stripped and PVD coated with a smoked chrome metal vapor deposition process, NOT real chrome though, thankfully. Ordered the Akebono rotors with cryo treatment and low dust Hawk HPS pads and after about 150 miles on each, there is only one major difference, dust. Before the switch, I had to clean the entire wheel package once or twice per week to keep it from looking like a fire salvage sale vehicle. I switched over to Flash Brown Royal wheel cleaner, as it worked just as well as Sonax on new wheels but for much less money.

Until I figure out what to do with them, I’ve got stored in the shed, my OEM upgraded forged matte black wheels with Pirelli run flat summer tires, all original 2-piece Brembo rotors and Brembo pads, with those contemptible OEM lugnuts.
Now I’ve got four very nice 295/40R20 Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ tires, McGard toughnuts and cryo brakes. Smooth linear brake modulation, no vibrations at speed, no pulsing, and after using cryo-ed rotors so often for 25 yrs, I’ve come to trust and rely on them for all manor of street use, including some extremely spirited driving, but of course this is NOT a racing car. If it were, I’d be looking at calipers like Alcon XR6 that are far, FAR superior, with advanced heat management tech, rebuildable pad wear abutment plates, hard coat anodized etc, but to keep it real, it’s only a rather nice pleasure vehicle, it’s not competing for seasonal championship points.

I’m not going to delude myself into thinking that this SRT Durango is the primary tool of a high-bucks racing venture. The whole point of driving over 60 brand new vehicles in the last year while researching the best choice for my needs, was to keep things in balanced perspective. After a lifetime of building, maintaining, testing and driving competition cars, boats, bikes, trucks, etc, I knew I did not want to suffer that reality for my choice in a weekend pleasure vehicle.

Note: when swapping rotors and installing Hawk HPS pads on an SRT DD with the OEM Brembo calipers, you will need a 3/16” drift punch, an E-20 female torx socket for the front caliper bolts, an M18 6 point socket for the rear, and be aware that the rear pads have no wear indicator tabs (squeelers), and all four front pads have them, so you will have to remove two squeelers with pliers to get the inboard pads fully nested in place. I recommend cleaning off the old anti seize from the abutment surfaces and re-coating with a dab of ultra high temp copper anti seize compound. Also, the front pad spring clips can be installed upside down if you disregard the arrow stamped on it. Ask me how I know.
I just sent you a message
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I ordered this SRT with 3-season tires, upgraded wheels & two piece rotors. When I drove it home, (8 miles!) all 4 wheels looked as though they were salvaged from a really bad garage fire. Black soot everywhere, so I removed the wheels and cleaned everything with Sonax. Then I drove it to work one day, (50 miles) and upon returning home, found an even worse soot problem, so I purchased another full set of forged 10x20s (same style) sent them out to be stripped and PVD coated with a smoked chrome metal vapor deposition process, NOT real chrome though, thankfully. Ordered the Akebono rotors with cryo treatment and low dust Hawk HPS pads and after about 150 miles on each, there is only one major difference, dust. Before the switch, I had to clean the entire wheel package once or twice per week to keep it from looking like a fire salvage sale vehicle. I switched over to Flash Brown Royal wheel cleaner, as it worked just as well as Sonax on new wheels but for much less money.

Until I figure out what to do with them, I’ve got stored in the shed, my OEM upgraded forged matte black wheels with Pirelli run flat summer tires, all original 2-piece Brembo rotors and Brembo pads, with those contemptible OEM lugnuts.
Now I’ve got four very nice 295/40R20 Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ tires, McGard toughnuts and cryo brakes. Smooth linear brake modulation, no vibrations at speed, no pulsing, and after using cryo-ed rotors so often for 25 yrs, I’ve come to trust and rely on them for all manor of street use, including some extremely spirited driving, but of course this is NOT a racing car. If it were, I’d be looking at calipers like Alcon XR6 that are far, FAR superior, with advanced heat management tech, rebuildable pad wear abutment plates, hard coat anodized etc, but to keep it real, it’s only a rather nice pleasure vehicle, it’s not competing for seasonal championship points.

I’m not going to delude myself into thinking that this SRT Durango is the primary tool of a high-bucks racing venture. The whole point of driving over 60 brand new vehicles in the last year while researching the best choice for my needs, was to keep things in balanced perspective. After a lifetime of building, maintaining, testing and driving competition cars, boats, bikes, trucks, etc, I knew I did not want to suffer that reality for my choice in a weekend pleasure vehicle.

Note: when swapping rotors and installing Hawk HPS pads on an SRT DD with the OEM Brembo calipers, you will need a 3/16” drift punch, an E-20 female torx socket for the front caliper bolts, an M18 6 point socket for the rear, and be aware that the rear pads have no wear indicator tabs (squeelers), and all four front pads have them, so you will have to remove two squeelers with pliers to get the inboard pads fully nested in place. I recommend cleaning off the old anti seize from the abutment surfaces and re-coating with a dab of ultra high temp copper anti seize compound. Also, the front pad spring clips can be installed upside down if you disregard the arrow stamped on it. Ask me how I know.
Good call on the tires, loving my A/S3+'s so far and looking forward to the new A/S 4's that Michelin just announced this month.

Also sent you a message to take the OE Brembo Hardware off your hands if someone else didn't already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
There is an interesting read out there somewhere from one of the brake companies that says there is no such thing as warped rotors. In the article it claims that what causes a pulsation is a hard stop from higher speed and then holding on the brakes right after. The claim is that while the pads and rotors are very hot from the stop, you deposit/impregnate a layer of brake pad material onto the rotor in that one place, now causing a slightly different friction surface around the rotor. The fix according to the article is to allow the vehicle to slowly creep forward after any panic stop to prevent. Ill try and find it but its different than the regular school of thought of warped rotors. Resurfacing the rotors would also remove the material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Yeah, the actual rotor doesn't really warp. It's usually spots on the rotor that get hot and harder than the rest of the rotor material. Then it doesn't wear down the same, and creates high spots.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: TireNrd and M-D-Z

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
The 2-piece front rotors for Durango are basically the Hellcat design, but am told are slightly thicker. The Durango version of these is the optional $1200 front brake upgrade for MY2019, and very likely could be retrofitted to MY2018s, but I hope you are sitting down when you see how much Mopar wants for them - last time I checked the OEM Hellcat front rotor P/N, they were still over $600 each, and that was down from something like $800 each when I first bought my car :shock:
When you said you hoped the OP would be sitting down, you weren't kidding. :) I bought my new Durango SRT in June of 2018. I promise you I do not drive the truck aggressively yet surprisingly had to have both front and rear pads and rotors replaced last September of 2019. I could hear the fronts squeaking. Took it to the dealership where I was shown how low the pads were. Those on the rear also looked like they weren't far behind. What also alarmed me was the service tech's perhaps unintentionally, off-handed response to my inquiry of why I'd need new pads and rotors so soon of "Yeah. With Brembos, you're lucky to get two years out of them." Three-thousand, eight-hundred fifty-one dollars and seventeen cents later...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
When you said you hoped the OP would be sitting down, you weren't kidding. :) I bought my new Durango SRT in June of 2018. I promise you I do not drive the truck aggressively yet surprisingly had to have both front and rear pads and rotors replaced last September of 2019. I could hear the fronts squeaking. Took it to the dealership where I was shown how low the pads were. Those on the rear also looked like they weren't far behind. What also alarmed me was the service tech's perhaps unintentionally, off-handed response to my inquiry of why I'd need new pads and rotors so soon of "Yeah. With Brembos, you're lucky to get two years out of them." Three-thousand, eight-hundred fifty-one dollars and seventeen cents later...
I should mention the truck had 28,635 kms on the odometer at the time of the front and rear brakes and rotor replacement.
 

·
Registered
‘18 SRT
Joined
·
35 Posts
Hey,

History lesson is not required but suffice to say that I have experience with the OEM replacement costs as well as my Powerstop Z26.

I know that 'cost' is not necessarily at the top of our list when owning this vehicle but having said that I was able to do the whole car, front and rear, rotors and pads for less than it was for me to replace the fronts with OEM. I am 97% happy with them. Happy enough that I would replace with the same again. The rotors look better as well so curb appeal goes up.
So where’s the link so the rest of us don’t have to spend our retirement money on just rotors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
So where’s the link so the rest of us don’t have to spend our retirement money on just rotors.

But of course with the Hellcat on the books... I know where my retirement money is likely going....


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
‘18 SRT
Joined
·
35 Posts
Hey,

History lesson is not required but suffice to say that I have experience with the OEM replacement costs as well as my Powerstop Z26.

I know that 'cost' is not necessarily at the top of our list when owning this vehicle but having said that I was able to do the whole car, front and rear, rotors and pads for less than it was for me to replace the fronts with OEM. I am 97% happy with them. Happy enough that I would replace with the same again. The rotors look better as well so curb appeal goes up.
Hey bro so

But of course with the Hellcat on the books... I know where my retirement money is likely going....


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Hey bro the page you sent gives options for a 330 or 350 mm front/rear rotor as well as a 1pc option kit. Question is which one is for our trucks and which one did you use?
 
41 - 60 of 75 Posts
Top