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Nick:
Before you go ANY further, have you had the battery properly load tested? The fact that you mentioned it was hard to start, could mean your battery is on the way out. Have it checked, and replace it if it comes back less than 100%.
When a battery starts to go, it can cause all kinds of ghost trouble codes to appear.
I also second and third the use of oem sensors when possible. Some aftermarket are good, and some are crap. Any of them can be bad right out of the box.

When you have the battery checked, before you fire it back up, leave the negative cable off, depress the brake pedal 30 seconds, and reconnect. Then, fire itup and see what you have.

Don
 
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
No I have not had the battery tested I just figured since it starts the battery was probably good. I am really new to all of this so basically a weekend mechanic in training. What should the battery be reading?
 

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Nick:
Just because a given battery will start the vehicle, does not mean it is in good health. It needs to be under a specific current drain, for a given amount of time, and maintain a minimum voltage. If it does not pass, time for a new one.
The battery does much more on the vehicles of today, with their menagerie of computers. They help the charging system maintain a strong, stable, reference voltage under varying loads. They also act a filter for spikes and transients.

Don
 

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Have you checked non-computer related things like the spark plugs, air filter, etc? Just basic tuneup stuff? My 4.7 did a lot of what you're talking about with the hard starts, poor performance, etc and I found out my 100k mile truck had the factory plugs in it...plugs that are supposed to be replaced at 40k and the electrodes were actually worn off so far they were flush with the threads.

Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
So my local parts store O reily told me it would be about 90 mins to check the battery because it has to charge it up. I just pulled it out of the lovely durango yesterday night. Does this sound about right or is that a way to tell the battery wasn't doing what it was supposed to?
 

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Need to have the battery fully charged and then load tested to get an accurate reading. 90 minutes isn't so bad unless you'[re into "Instant Gratification"! Had to go through the same ordeal for the warranty on a battery from VatoZone. Seems all the auto parts stores are more critical about testing batteries for warranty claims.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
So the idle between normal and 1500 rpms (2000rps when the gas pedal is pushed) is still happening. Anybody have any clues or should I just start from scratch to make sure my work is done properly before I go replacing sensors again?
 

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Nick:
Good on the battery passing muster. This idle thing. What you mean, is when you push the go pedal, the rpms will hang up in the 1.5-2k range, and not settle back to 600 where they should be?

Re this engine rebuild, unless you know for a fact that all of the sensors were replaced, some of them might not have been. If they were, might be China crap that went back in. Have you pulled a plug or two to verify they were in fact replaced. Also, what plug is in there? Hopefully a new set of oem Champions.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
No I have not checked the plugs myself. I will check them this weekend and the guy told me he got all the sensors from oreily so I just have no clue on where to even go next with this thing. The wife wants to get rid of it but it only has 141000 miles on it so it has alot of life left so im not really wanting to get rid of it and with me being the only one working with four kids under 10 years old I don't have the funds to take it to a dealership for them to dick me around. Lost and confused on this thing.
 

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Agree with others about using the oem sensor ONLY. Many aftermarket components these days may be cheaper but no bargain because they don't work or are incompatible specification wise.

If you try an oem sensor, and you've replaced the harness then there's only a couple of things left it's likely to be....

The PCM may be defective.

The engine timing has changed for some reason.

The "node" on the crankshaft pulse wheel (the thing that the sensor is detecting) is damaged or possibly no longer close enough to the sensor for some reason.

Many times the node is a pin that protrudes from the wheel (I'm not positive about your engine) that gets bent. Often the pulse wheel will move too close to, or further away from, the sensor due to engine wear. Inspect the old sensor for signs of contact with the wheel.

Determining that the pulse wheel is undamaged or hasn't moved should be done before condemning the computer.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I appreciate the input and will definitely put it into consideration. I'm going to replace the sensor again tomorrow and hopfully that will solve my problem. I just can't help but think its the most simple thing and I'm overlooking it to try and find a deeper problem that doesn't exist. Thanks alot guys will update probably tomorrow night.
 

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A code for the crank sensor doesn't necessarily mean it's bad - there's connections & a bit of wiring between it, and the engine computer that should be checked first. Loose pin fitment or corrosion in connectors have sold thousands of unneeded engine management sensors in just one year alone.

Another recommendation for OE only parts here - aftermarket sensors from most parts stores are absolute garbage. That said, I've had good luck with WVE sensors in the past if OE is too pricey.
 
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