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I have a 2007 durango 4.7 , it will start..but then can't maintain idle and dies, then I can't start it again till I unhook neg battery cable ..then back to starts but can't stay at idle. I recently replaced spark plugs,coils, tps,pcv valve and hose and cleaned EGR. Any advice would be beyond amazing
 

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Kats:
Welcome to DDN. How old is the battery, and how many miles on your D? Have you done the key dance to see if any trouble codes are stored?

Don
 

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Battery only 1yr old. 134,000 miles approx. Have done the key dance ( remove neg terminal then 5 on off with key to reprogram PCM). Have had my hands on quite a few components at this point...so really starting to feel like chasing my tale
 

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I would either invest in a good scanner (don't spend less than $300) or bring it to a shop.
 

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Had a similar problem with a 2001 Dodge truck. Replaced a bunch of parts with no luck. Was told to remove the postitive battery terminal from the battery and run a jumper wire from the disconnected positive to the negative terminal on the battery for about 30 seconds to hard boot the computer. Re hooked and it fired right up. On that truck I had to do that every time the battery went dead but it always fixed it. Not sure if it will help you but it won't cost a dime. Good luck.
 

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Kats:
Not sure what your referring to as far as the battery and 5 on/off. The key dance is 3 cycles of off/on to read out any stored trouble codes via the odometer display. If you are wanting to reset the PCM, you disconnect the negative terminal, depress the brake pedal 30 seconds, and then reconnect. Since your battery is not new, it needs to be properly load tested, and declared 100%, or bad. New batteries do go bad. You will indeed chase your tail big time, if that battery is a flaky mess.

Don
 

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Ah! Sorry about referring to the wrong type of "key dance"...yes...I have done the check with the key to check for faults. In the beginning when having this issue I checked for faults...before I started disconnecting the battery only fault I received was a P700 I believe...which is what led me to check and replace all sparkplugs and coils. I haven't checked every coil to make sure they all work...but now I unfortunately don't believe I've been able to keep the car running long enough to cause a fault to reappear again. Feel like any sensor that may be causing an issue I have replaced...so now trying to bring back to basics...like looking at what things needed for a car to start, fuel, air, and spark. I haven't done a vacuum test either...maybe that might be a good route after load testing the battery?
 

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Had a similar problem with a 2001 Dodge truck. Replaced a bunch of parts with no luck. Was told to remove the postitive battery terminal from the battery and run a jumper wire from the disconnected positive to the negative terminal on the battery for about 30 seconds to hard boot the computer. Re hooked and it fired right up. On that truck I had to do that every time the battery went dead but it always fixed it. Not sure if it will help you but it won't cost a dime. Good luck.
I will try that. Thank you
 

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P0700 is a general transmission fault code. It's telling you there are one or more underlying transmission codes that need to be read. Those codes can't be retrieved with the key dance check. Even the cheaper scanners should be able to get those codes.
 

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P0700 is a general transmission fault code. It's telling you there are one or more underlying transmission codes that need to be read. Those codes can't be retrieved with the key dance check. Even the cheaper scanners should be able to get those codes.
Sometimes they can, but in my case, I decided to spend the extra money and get a good scanner that can read DTCs, Trans, ABS, and SRS. For all of those features, I was looking at $300 for a scanner minimum.

Originally, I was trying to read an ABS code on my wife's equinox. I rented a Bosch scanner that was $300 and it only pointed me to the wheel. The Innova 7111 that I bought for $500 was able to tell me which wheel and more specific to the code telling me I was getting intermittent reading from the sensor, which pointed toward the hub itself.

The Innova is certainly no replacement for a DRB or even a Snap-on, but it was even able to read DTCs from the factory radio in my DD.
 

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For the ABS and Air Bag systems you'll need a more expensive scanner. However for this situation most if not all cheaper scanners will get the underlying transmission codes along with most if not all of the PCM codes etc. For the OPs case.....I think a cheaper one would work. We're talking about getting the vehicle running and the ABS/SRS systems aren't going to be the cause of that.

As far as a more expensive one. I bought a Vident I450 off Ebay for less than $150 and it reads all the modules along with being able to run tests on module controlled components. I used it on my 2004 SLT 4.7L to exercise the ABS pump to bleed the brakes, etc.

I also have an Innova that cost me around $80 that reads ABS and Air Bag codes. Just saying there are cheaper options than $300-500 to get started.
 

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For the ABS and Air Bag systems you'll need a more expensive scanner. However for this situation most if not all cheaper scanners will get the underlying transmission codes along with most if not all of the PCM codes etc. For the OPs case.....I think a cheaper one would work. We're talking about getting the vehicle running and the ABS/SRS systems aren't going to be the cause of that.

As far as a more expensive one. I bought a Vident I450 off Ebay for less than $150 and it reads all the modules along with being able to run tests on module controlled components. I used it on my 2004 SLT 4.7L to exercise the ABS pump to bleed the brakes, etc.

I also have an Innova that cost me around $80 that reads ABS and Air Bag codes. Just saying there are cheaper options than $300-500 to get started.
I have never had luck with cheaper scanners, myself. I think if $300 is not affordable, the next best solution would be to check the local auto parts shop. Most of them have a rental. The one in my town used to only require a license to borrow it, but they had too many of them disappear. Now, they allow you to buy it and return it the next day for full refund; same as the rest of their rental tool program.
 

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Slightly off topic, but I purchased this little gem to replace my 20 year old basic OBD-II code reader. It does everything I need and was pretty reasonably priced...ABS, Air Bags/SRS, transmission info,, real time data, etc. Like it so far, just throwing it out there.


Back on topic:

KatS04, can you keep the motor running with the throttle at all? It doesn't idle, but can you run it at 2k rpm with your right foot for example? When it starts, how does it sound while its running? Is it smooth and sounds normal or does it run rough or anything?

Does the tach work? Not just when running, but does it bounce slightly while cranking? If not, it might be the crankshaft position sensor.

I've had multiple throttle position sensors go out on me, but it looks like you've replaced that already...I'm wondering if you have a wiring harness problem or maybe just a loose/dirty plug. I'd re-examine where you've done work to be sure you put everything back together nice and tight, maybe get some contact spray cleaner and just clean all of the sensor plugs.
 

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Any chance you tested the fuel pressure? It could be a culprit if it starts, runs rough then dies. If the pump is restricted, it may take a while to build pressure, then it may lose it as soon as it starts.
 

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Slightly off topic, but I purchased this little gem to replace my 20 year old basic OBD-II code reader. It does everything I need and was pretty reasonably priced...ABS, Air Bags/SRS, transmission info,, real time data, etc. Like it so far, just throwing it out there.


Back on topic:

KatS04, can you keep the motor running with the throttle at all? It doesn't idle, but can you run it at 2k rpm with your right foot for example? When it starts, how does it sound while its running? Is it smooth and sounds normal or does it run rough or anything?

Does the tach work? Not just when running, but does it bounce slightly while cranking? If not, it might be the crankshaft position sensor.

I've had multiple throttle position sensors go out on me, but it looks like you've replaced that already...I'm wondering if you have a wiring harness problem or maybe just a loose/dirty plug. I'd re-examine where you've done work to be sure you put everything back together nice and tight, maybe get some contact spray cleaner and just clean all of the sensor plugs.
Sorry...long work week kept me away from working on car. Since Saturday back to it. Yes, I plan on putting hands back on everything I changes or touched today to make sure all was installed and properly tightened. It really is frustrating. Don't want to just get another car. But I've been chasing these stupid symptoms for a bit now. If I press accelerator pedal it does stay running. At one point got to take on brief road test... couldn't accelerate to anything over 40mph , but that was before I found the broken pcv valve hose and before cleaning the egr.
 

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As far as not idling. Maybe you have a bad IAC or it's disconnected? (Idle Air Controller) It's used on the 4.7L but not the 5.7L.

MOTOR-IDLE AIR CONTROL
DESCRIPTION
A separate IAC motor is not used with the 5.7L V-8 engine.
The IAC stepper motor is mounted to the throttle body, and regulates the amount of air bypassing the control of the
throttle plate. As engine loads and ambient temperatures change, engine rpm changes. A pintle on the IAC stepper
motor protrudes into a passage in the throttle body, controlling air flow through the passage. The IAC is controlled
by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) to maintain the target engine idle speed.
OPERATION
A separate IAC motor is not used with the 5.7L V-8 engine.
At idle, engine speed can be increased by retracting the IAC motor pintle and allowing more air to pass through the
port, or it can be decreased by restricting the passage with the pintle and diminishing the amount of air bypassing
the throttle plate.
The IAC is called a stepper motor because it is moved (rotated) in steps, or increments. Opening the IAC opens an
air passage around the throttle blade which increases RPM.
14 - 34 FUEL INJECTION HB
The PCM uses the IAC motor to control idle speed (along with timing) and to reach a desired MAP during decel
(keep engine from stalling).
The IAC motor has 4 wires with 4 circuits. Two of the wires are for 12 volts and ground to supply electrical current
to the motor windings to operate the stepper motor in one direction. The other 2 wires are also for 12 volts and
ground to supply electrical current to operate the stepper motor in the opposite direction.
To make the IAC go in the opposite direction, the PCM just reverses polarity on both windings. If only 1 wire is
open, the IAC can only be moved 1 step (increment) in either direction. To keep the IAC motor in position when no
movement is needed, the PCM will energize both windings at the same time. This locks the IAC motor in place.
In the IAC motor system, the PCM will count every step that the motor is moved. This allows the PCM to determine
the motor pintle position. If the memory is cleared, the PCM no longer knows the position of the pintle. So at the
first key ON, the PCM drives the IAC motor closed, regardless of where it was before. This zeros the counter. From
this point the PCM will back out the IAC motor and keep track of its position again.
When engine rpm is above idle speed, the IAC is used for the following:
² Off-idle dashpot (throttle blade will close quickly but idle speed will not stop quickly)
² Deceleration air flow control
² A/C compressor load control (also opens the passage slightly before the compressor is engaged so that the
engine rpm does not dip down when the compressor engages)
² Power steering load control
The PCM can control polarity of the circuit to control direction of the stepper motor.
IAC Stepper Motor Program: The PCM is also equipped with a memory program that records the number of steps
the IAC stepper motor most recently advanced to during a certain set of parameters. For example: The PCM was
attempting to maintain a 1000 rpm target during a cold start-up cycle. The last recorded number of steps for that
may have been 125. That value would be recorded in the memory cell so that the next time the PCM recognizes
the identical conditions, the PCM recalls that 125 steps were required to maintain the target. This program allows
for greater customer satisfaction due to greater control of engine idle.
Another function of the memory program, which occurs when the power steering switch (if equipped), or the A/C
request circuit, requires that the IAC stepper motor control engine rpm, is the recording of the last targeted steps
into the memory cell. The PCM can anticipate A/C compressor loads. This is accomplished by delaying compressor
operation for approximately 0.5 seconds until the PCM moves the IAC stepper motor to the recorded steps that
were loaded into the memory cell. Using this program helps eliminate idle-quality changes as loads change. Finally,
the PCM incorporates a 9No-Load9 engine speed limiter of approximately 1800 - 2000 rpm, when it recognizes that
the TPS is indicating an idle signal and IAC motor cannot maintain engine idle.
A (factory adjusted) set screw is used to mechanically limit the position of the throttle body throttle plate. Never
attempt to adjust the engine idle speed using this screw. All idle speed functions are controlled by the IAC
motor through the PCM.
 

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You indicate you changed the TPS. There are two sensors on the side of the throttle body.....which one did you change? The upper or lower one?

The upper one is the TPS and the lower one is the IAC. Check the connectors on both of them.

If you changed the lower one you changed the IAC and not the TPS. Where did you get the replacement from? Dealer or crap aftermarket?
 

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And for the EGR cleaning.......are you sure you have a good seal between the intake and EGR tubing? Maybe a vacuum leak. Or if your EGR valve is bad and partially open it can cause the poor/no idle issue.
 
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