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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, I found this forum a few days after ordered a 22 DD with TnG. Great forum and I have get lot of information that I need.
I ordered this vehicle because it has the ability to take families as well as towing. I have spent some time reading the some posts and hopefully someone can correct me if I am wrong and also I have a few questions to ask.

I was aware of the DD has a max payload of 1260lbs and all my passengers and cargo will be around 700lbs so that means I have 560lbs left for the to tongue weight. And based on the fact that most of TT's tongue weight is 10%-15% of the trailer so that means I have a towing range of 3700lbs - 5600lbs depending on the actual tongue weight of the trailer. I also get an information that I need to stick within the vehicle's axle weight limit. So my first question is: if my above calculation is correct then how would I know the weight I have on the front (max 3200lbs) and rear axle (max 3900lbs)?

My 2nd question is, Dodge says DD RT has GVWR of 7100lbs and curb weight of 5300lbs. But when I add the max payload of 1260lbs to 5300lbs, I am still $540 lbs less than the GVWR. Can I please have someone explain this to me?

Regards to the trailer, I and my wife are looking at 1 small TT (3500lbs dry, 21ft) and another one which is slightly bigger (4500lbs dry, 27ft). I am not too concern about the weight as I can get rid some of the cargo weight if I have to, but can some one tell me if 27ft trailer is too long for a DD? And also, I believe I will get the WDH to be at the safe side but does WDH effect the function of RT Tow N G's self leveling rear stock?

Above are all the question and BIG thanks if you are spending time reading this! I would appreciate seeing reply with answers and questions!
 

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The actual curb weight is closer to 5500 lbs. I have towed boats that weigh 5600 lbs with my old Ram 1500 with the 5.2 in the mountains of WV. I think you should be fine.
 

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2015 Odyssey EX-L; 2015 Durango Citadel (Hemi AWD)
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So my first question is: if my above calculation is correct then how would I know the weight I have on the front (max 3200lbs) and rear axle (max 3900lbs)?
Easy, locate your nearest truck scales and go get your vehicle weighed with the trailer hooked up. You'll get a printout that shows the front axle, rear axle, and trailer axles (combined) each with their own weights. https://catscale.com/cat-scale-locator/

My 2nd question is, Dodge says DD RT has GVWR of 7100lbs and curb weight of 5300lbs. But when I add the max payload of 1260lbs to 5300lbs, I am still $540 lbs less than the GVWR. Can I please have someone explain this to me?
This has been noted many times and you can find multiple threads on it. Bottom line is that the limiting factor is the rear axle limit for the Durango. The max payload of 1260 is basically what you can put in the back before you hit 3900 lbs on the rear axle. There just isn't a lot of wiggle room there unfortunately.


Regards to the trailer, I and my wife are looking at 1 small TT (3500lbs dry, 21ft) and another one which is slightly bigger (4500lbs dry, 27ft). I am not too concern about the weight as I can get rid some of the cargo weight if I have to, but can some one tell me if 27ft trailer is too long for a DD? And also, I believe I will get the WDH to be at the safe side but does WDH effect the function of RT Tow N G's self leveling rear stock?
Conventional wisdom here on the forums is that 28 feet is about the max length you want to go. I recently towed at 28 footer, and it was great as long as the winds were fairly calm! Up here in the high plains, when the winds kicked up it was a handful, causing me to slow to 50mph or so even on the highway...and that's using an Equalizer WDH with 4-pt sway. The longer the trailer the more crosswinds it will catch. Your local terrain and weather patterns play into what conditions you'll face on the road, so lots to consider there.

As for the self-leveling shocks, they work really well. It does make it a bit harder to figure the WDH setup, but you can use the CAT scales to measure how much weight is being transferred back to the front axle. The self leveling shocks do a great job of eliminating any rear squat, so really you just want to get the front axel weight to be close to what it is with the trailer unhooked. If you're buying the trailer you can play around with the setup until you get it where it feels (and weighs) good.

Last comment is to be advised that with the larger trailer, dry weight 4500 (with probably 450 or 500 listed tongue weight), when you add propane, battery, and normal camping stuff that trailer will probably weigh around 800 lbs at the tongue, and probably around 5500 lbs total. You can get the tongue weight down a bit by loading carefully, but the battery and propane just add a LOT to the manufacture listed dry tongue weight for any travel trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The actual curb weight is closer to 5500 lbs. I have towed boats that weigh 5600 lbs with my old Ram 1500 with the 5.2 in the mountains of WV. I think you should be fine.
Thanks you for your reply! I believe Ram1500P/C has a lot more max payload than my Durango does so you can easily tow a 5500lbs trailer even with full crew. My concern is that the tongue weight of a 5000lbs trailer plus weight of my crew and cargo exceed the max payload.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Easy, locate your nearest truck scales and go get your vehicle weighed with the trailer hooked up. You'll get a printout that shows the front axle, rear axle, and trailer axles (combined) each with their own weights. https://catscale.com/cat-scale-locator/


This has been noted many times and you can find multiple threads on it. Bottom line is that the limiting factor is the rear axle limit for the Durango. The max payload of 1260 is basically what you can put in the back before you hit 3900 lbs on the rear axle. There just isn't a lot of wiggle room there unfortunately.



Conventional wisdom here on the forums is that 28 feet is about the max length you want to go. I recently towed at 28 footer, and it was great as long as the winds were fairly calm! Up here in the high plains, when the winds kicked up it was a handful, causing me to slow to 50mph or so even on the highway...and that's using an Equalizer WDH with 4-pt sway. The longer the trailer the more crosswinds it will catch. Your local terrain and weather patterns play into what conditions you'll face on the road, so lots to consider there.

As for the self-leveling shocks, they work really well. It does make it a bit harder to figure the WDH setup, but you can use the CAT scales to measure how much weight is being transferred back to the front axle. The self leveling shocks do a great job of eliminating any rear squat, so really you just want to get the front axel weight to be close to what it is with the trailer unhooked. If you're buying the trailer you can play around with the setup until you get it where it feels (and weighs) good.

Last comment is to be advised that with the larger trailer, dry weight 4500 (with probably 450 or 500 listed tongue weight), when you add propane, battery, and normal camping stuff that trailer will probably weigh around 800 lbs at the tongue, and probably around 5500 lbs total. You can get the tongue weight down a bit by loading carefully, but the battery and propane just add a LOT to the manufacture listed dry tongue weight for any travel trailer.
Thank you soooooo much for the detailed explanation as well as your answer refers to each of my question.
I think I will mostly stick with the smaller trailer for now since I am a “new driver” when it comes to towing plus my driveway is a bit too short for a TT longer than 24ft.

Honestly it is just frustrate that a 6 seats,V8 engine SUV can not tow much when carrying full crew.
But anyways, your answers pretty much answers all my questions. Thanks again!

Last thing, can you please share which WDH and anti-sway device you have with the trailer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The self leveling shocks do a great job of eliminating any rear squat, so really you just want to get the front axel weight to be close to what it is with the trailer unhooked. If you're buying the trailer you can play around with the setup until you get it where it feels (and weighs) good.
I guess I can measure the gap between wheel and fender edge when it’s unhooked and then try to play with the WDH to match that height, right?
 

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As far as WDH's, I use a Fastway E2 (8000/800#) for my two axle flat bed trailer and a BlueOx TrackPro (6000/600#) for my Aspen Trail 17BH travel trailer. Both work the same way and have done well on long trips in varied terrain. People speak highly of the Equalizer WDH system too.
 

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I guess I can measure the gap between wheel and fender edge when it’s unhooked and then try to play with the WDH to match that height, right?
That's right. Using fender measurements is the standard method for dialing in the WDH. It becomes trickier to measure how much weight is being shifted when the back end is compensating itsf with the load leveling suspension. Somewhere (WDH instructions maybe) I read that for load leveling suspension you're trying to get back to the original measurement of the front fender, whereas with regular rear suspensions you're only trying to get about halfway back to the original mark.

For anti-sway, I have used a Fastway E2 on other vehicles which I was perfectly happy with. On the larger trailer I borrowed an Equalizer (10k hitch for a 6k trailer), and I was impressed how composed things stayed even in higher winds. It was "both hands on the wheel" for sure, but I wouldn't call it white knuckle at any point.
 
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