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Well the thread title says it all. My 2011 Durango Crew 3.6L does not rev past 3500 rpms. Other than the dash warning light being on, the vehicle works perfectly. But once the revs hit 3500ish, it feels like the engine is hitting a rev limiter. Lift the accelerator pedal, drop the rpms, and all is good again. The problem exists in all 5 gears and all vehicle speeds including stationary in neutral & park.

A quick OBDII scan pulled up code P0349 Camshaft Position Sensor "A" Circuit Intermittent Bank 2. Two other codes pulled up: both P06DD which was some sort of generic error.

Questions:

Where exactly is the Camshaft Position Sensor on the 3.6L V6?

Which side of the engine is Bank 2, driver or passenger side?

Would a simple swap-out of a sensor cure my problem? I realize this is hard to answer. I'm looking for others who have had the same problem.

Is this a simple DIY part swap out which can be done with basic hand tools in my driveway in freezing weather or am I better off taking the car to the dealer for service? I'd imagine at 4 years old and 35K miles, I'm out of warranty.

Can someone provide me with a OE part number?

I would greatly appreciate the help folks. Dropping off the car at the dealership, even for a day, is a huge inconvenience for me. This is my 3rd Durango and I absolutely love them.

PPMMX
 

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I had to replace a cam position sensor in my 14 with 3.6 and it wasn't really a big deal. They had it done while it was in for an oil change. Mine was causing starting issues and not rev issues. Others can weigh in, but I figured I'd let you know that it wasn't a major deal.
 

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I don't have the '11 codes, but on a '14 GC 3.6L the P06DD code is "dual stage oil pump stuck low"

This check is run when (surprise!) the engine speed exceeds 3500RPM. Either your oil pressure is low or your oil pressure sensor is bad.

Low oil pressure could be due to a bad or incorrectly installed filter/oring/etc, wrong oil viscosity, contaminated oil, bad oil pump or solenoid, or the usual culprits (loose bearings etc)


The engine oil pump features seven vanes and a moving element that continuously adjusts to maintain a regulated oil pressure supply by varying the displacement of the pump. The pump has two regulated pressure stages of operation controlled by an on/off solenoid. Low pressure mode regulation (solenoid on) is approximately 200 kPa (29 psi) and high pressure mode regulation (solenoid off) is approximately 450 kPa (65 psi). The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) switches the pump between stages based on engine operating conditions, oil and coolant temperatures, speed and load. Under most typical conditions, the pump will run in low mode from idle up to around 3000 RPM and switch from low to high mode between 3000 and 4000 RPM. The maximum oil pressure in the engine is limited to 1000 kPa (145 psi) by the relief valve. Pressure in the main oil gallery of the engine can be monitored with diagnostic equipment through the oil pressure sensor mounted on the rear of the oil filter module. The minimum pressure for the engine is 41 kPa (6 psi) at any operating condition. Anything under this pressure could result in damage to critical moving parts.

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When Monitored: The monitor runs when engine speed (RPM) is over a calibrated value, based on engine oil temperature. When the engine oil temperature is lower, the engine speed necessary to enable the monitor will be lower (Minimum speed is 1000 RPM). To evaluate the dual stage oil pump, fully warm up the engine. To run DUAL STAGE OIL PUMP STUCK LOW (P06DD), drive vehicle with engine speed over 3500 RPM.
Whether this fault causes RPM limiting to protect the engine, I do not know.
 

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Also found with a bit of googling:

MIL Illumination P06DD - Engine Oil Pressure Control Circuit Stuck Off Due To Incorrect Oil Filter

Discussion:
Vehicles have been showing up at Dealers with Diagnostic Trouble Code P06DD set. One cause of
this DTC has been determined to be that the wrong oil filter has been installed after an oil change by
an independent repair facility or the Customer that has purchased the oil filter in the aftermarket.
These filters may be too short or even slightly too wide (fig. 1).
If this code is present, first verify that the correct Mopar oil filter has been installed. If the incorrect
filter is installed correct this condition and inform the customer that they should return to the point of
purchase for a refund.
now I gotta get back to work :(
 

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Know this is an old post. But I had my oil change done about 2 weeks ago now I'm getting this code. I'm sitting at the dealer now (took to a local quick lube shop normally for the oil change). Having them do an oil change and reset the code and I'll go from there and see what happens...
 

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Know this is an old post. But I had my oil change done about 2 weeks ago now I'm getting this code. I'm sitting at the dealer now (took to a local quick lube shop normally for the oil change). Having them do an oil change and reset the code and I'll go from there and see what happens...
Many times with the 3.6, a broken oil filter bypass valve can cause a low oil pressure condition. This is becoming a more common issue with the older 3.6's. Not a lot of people know about it, or the fact that there is a cheap and easy fix. Take a look at this video...


If the bypass valve is open (because it broke), all the oil is going through the oil cooler thus the oil cooler is acting as a bottleneck and causing low oil pressure at the sensor (and in the engine). Don't drive it like this!

This issue can also be caused by the installation of the wrong size drop in filter, which can happen at quick-lubes. But it's usually the bypass valve has broken. It can be easy to miss. This issue can be mis-diagnosed as a bad oil pressure sensor, a bad oil pump (big $$), a bad oil pump solenoid or any number of expensive things - so before you pay for anything, make sure the bypass valve is intact and if it isn't, use the Dorman 917-992 repair kit. I keep one in my glovebox (right next to a spare fuel pump relay) just in case!

Sometimes, the bypass valve housing can break at a lower point, which would require you to change the whole oil cooler assembly ($400). Verify where it is broken (if it is) with your own eyes and do NOT trust what the dealer tells you because this particular failure is a KNOWN money maker for techs. An easy fix that can easily be reported to the owner as a very expensive one.

All that being said, it REALLY could be a bad oil pressure sensor. It REALLY could be a bad oil pump. It could be something catastrophic causing low oil pressure...it could be a hundred things. But what it more realistically probably is, is a wrong size oil filter or a broken oil bypass valve that is causing your low oil pressure (and subsequent P06DD code).
 

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Know this is an old post. But I had my oil change done about 2 weeks ago now I'm getting this code. I'm sitting at the dealer now (took to a local quick lube shop normally for the oil change). Having them do an oil change and reset the code and I'll go from there and see what happens...
Very common for aftermarket oil change shops to use the wrong filter on the 3.6L (the filter changed in 2014) or an aftermarket filter that doesn't fit correctly.
 

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So after getting the dealer to do an oil change and then I had to reset the code (Unplugging the battery for about 20 minutes since they said they wouldn't reset the code) the code came back after about 100 miles. Took it back to the dealership and it ended up being the Oil pump was bad. Luckily my brother had just started working at the dealership as a lube tech so they let me use his "discount" which they said saved me about $300. In total it cost $764 to replace the oil pump. Back to working A-Ok. Before this all happened I had watched the oil pressure in the past on the display just messing/looking through the menu's and it was always in the upper 20's to the mid 30's. Now it's typically in the low 30's at idle or when coasting at speed. When accelerating it goes up to the mid 40's and under hard acceleration gets into the 60's.

Hoping that if it was an issue was for awhile of the pump "going" bad I didn't do any real damage to the engine. I swear though this might be my last Dodge ever since I've bought it in early 2016 (as a used 2013 with 52k miles.) I've had to replace one rear shot that blew out, the fuel pump, the oil pump, and the transmission cooler.
 

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wouldn't that be covered under the 5/100k warranty on the motor?
 

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So after getting the dealer to do an oil change and then I had to reset the code (Unplugging the battery for about 20 minutes since they said they wouldn't reset the code) the code came back after about 100 miles. Took it back to the dealership and it ended up being the Oil pump was bad. Luckily my brother had just started working at the dealership as a lube tech so they let me use his "discount" which they said saved me about $300. In total it cost $764 to replace the oil pump. Back to working A-Ok. Before this all happened I had watched the oil pressure in the past on the display just messing/looking through the menu's and it was always in the upper 20's to the mid 30's. Now it's typically in the low 30's at idle or when coasting at speed. When accelerating it goes up to the mid 40's and under hard acceleration gets into the 60's.

Hoping that if it was an issue was for awhile of the pump "going" bad I didn't do any real damage to the engine. I swear though this might be my last Dodge ever since I've bought it in early 2016 (as a used 2013 with 52k miles.) I've had to replace one rear shot that blew out, the fuel pump, the oil pump, and the transmission cooler.
Huh. I'd almost certainly say you just got bent over by the dealer but if your brother works there, I really hope I'd be wrong so I won't say it.

It's just that there have been FAR more reports of bad sending units (there's a TSB I think), or the engine losing oil pressure as a result of a problem with the bypass valve (as I mentioned above) or a leak actually causing the volume of the oil to drop so low that the pressure drops than there have been of bad oil pumps. Kind of weird this manifested RIGHT AFTER an oil change, right?? In fact, I've read about numerous guys who are told oil pumps are bad only to have the problem return in a couple weeks, at which point the techs realize it was something less expensive after all.

Unfortunately, today's method of repairing things at dealers is to throw the most expensive component at the problem (it's faster that way) then they backtrack if the vehicles comes back in, when in reality it should be the other way around.

You said your oil pressure was ALWAYS in the 20's and 30's? When cold it should be up near 100 psi. Since you were getting 20-30 psi at all times leads me to believe that the pump was fine but maybe an oil pump solenoid may have gone bad. The 3.6 has a dual speed oil pump controlled by solenoids that pushes around 100 psi of oil pressure when the engine is cold and then drops DRASTICALLY when the engine warms up. Kind of a new and unique design. Unfortunately the solenoid is a part of the oil pump and cannot be replaced by itself. So who knows, maybe that's why they did the whole pump. I just think it's odd that it all started after a quickie-lube oil change.

Please keep an eye on it and post back if/when you get the code again and have to go back to the dealer. Also, regarding damage to the engine when you were getting 20-30 lbs of oil pressure - I wouldn't sweat it. Minimum normal oil pressure for the 3.6 is only 5 psi.
 
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