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Long story short. No.

The high compression in our motor requires the use of 91 or higher octane fuel. The use of these fuels prohibit engine knock and pinging.

If you do decide to use e85 you would to need an ECM retuned for it. Plus, a higher volume fuel pump, larger fuel lines, and injectors to handle the increased fuel use needed to run reliably.

In the end, would it be worth running e85 if you're using more to go the same distance?
 

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The 2011-15 3.6L V6 was flex fuel which means it has all the pieces/parts necessary to burn anything up to and including E85. With the change to the newer 3.6L in 2016 and later, no more E85 compatibility, only E10 or E15 pump gas.
 

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Since the SRT or the HC doesn't have an alcohol sensor, you can't run more than e10. You need more ethanol than gasoline for a complete combustion which is why e85 capable engines have bigger fuel injectors and pumps. The fuel alcohol sensor tells the ECU how much more fuel is needed for proper combustion along with the O2 sensor reading the aftermath. The sad part is since e85 typically has a higher octane of 100-105, our motors could benefit from it if they were equipped with the hardware and tuned for it.
 

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Since the SRT or the HC doesn't have an alcohol sensor, you can't run more than e10. You need more ethanol than gasoline for a complete combustion which is why e85 capable engines have bigger fuel injectors and pumps. The fuel alcohol sensor tells the ECU how much more fuel is needed for proper combustion along with the O2 sensor reading the aftermath. The sad part is since e85 typically has a higher octane of 100-105, our motors could benefit from it if they were equipped with the hardware and tuned for it.
But would it result in better performance?
I always understood E85 to just burn cleaner but not improve performance and actually diminish a vehicle's fuel economy.
 

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But would it result in better performance?
I always understood E85 to just burn cleaner but not improve performance and actually diminish a vehicle's fuel economy.
I guess it depends on how you define an engine's performance. E85 does reduce the fuel economy, but because of the higher octane you can run more aggressive spark timing therefore more power. E85 also burns cooler so you don't have to retard engine timing as quickly. If your vehicle has the correct hardware to sense ethanol, but doesn't have a different set of ignition timing tables for E85 the ECU will simply adjust the amount of fuel and then you don't really get the benefits.
 

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Definitely no.
No way to know that the materials in the fuel system are compatible with E85.
 

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Long story short. No.

The high compression in our motor requires the use of 91 or higher octane fuel. The use of these fuels prohibit engine knock and pinging.

If you do decide to use e85 you would to need an ECM retuned for it. Plus, a higher volume fuel pump, larger fuel lines, and injectors to handle the increased fuel use needed to run reliably.

In the end, would it be worth running e85 if you're using more to go the same distance?
I dont understand why anyone would want E85 if they're not running a turbo or supercharger.

Sure per gallon it might be marginally less cost but you get less MPG on the same amout of fuel. In the end it costs more to go the same distance.

With a supercharger or turbo it definately makes sense to run E85 because it runs cooler + pings less. These aspects are both positives in an engine that has additional stresses from forced induction. MPG probably doesnt matter in this application.
 

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E85 will literally dissolve plastics and rubber that were not meant to handle it. You could end up needing to replace your entire fuel system... tank, pump, lines, gas vents, injectors... all of it. If your owner's manual and/or stickers inside your fuel cap lid don't say E85 is okay, then just don't do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow! Well, thank you all! Not gonna touch the stuff! Trying to get any kind of edge, without violating the precious Cali smog laws, that suck like a methed out ex-wife on alimony...! Awesome advice! Appreciate you all!
 

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I guess it depends on how you define an engine's performance. E85 does reduce the fuel economy, but because of the higher octane you can run more aggressive spark timing therefore more power. E85 also burns cooler so you don't have to retard engine timing as quickly. If your vehicle has the correct hardware to sense ethanol, but doesn't have a different set of ignition timing tables for E85 the ECU will simply adjust the amount of fuel and then you don't really get the benefits.
Thanks for that explanation
 

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Thanks for that explanation
We have a 5.7 with a Wipple SC set for 9 psi and am using a blend of 80% 91 and 20% E/85 and works great. Do test fuel after every 5 to 8 tank full up without test seems to run better and does raise the octane to 94 or 95. Here in Cal. E-85 is about 2.50 less then 91 which about makes up for loss of millage. Put 2 gallons of E-85 just before fuel up.
 
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