Dodge Durango Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
While swapping out from the winter wheel /tire set to summer wheel /tire set, I referred to both the .pdf available on the Mopar app and hard copy of the Owners Manual and the only wheel torque spec I could find is 130 ft-lb. I recently searched the forum and found that SRT models wheel torque spec is 110 ft-lb.

What are you other DD TNG owners using as a torque spec? I am going to assume the DD TNG SRT components warrant using the 110 ft-lb torque spec.

Now, that the lug nuts are sitting @ 130 ft-lb, do I just back off each lug nut and re-tighten to 110 ft-lb? Is there any specific procedure that I should follow under the circumstances?

Thanks for the input.

Pat

Automotive tire Publication Tire Motor vehicle Plant




Font Rectangle Screenshot Parallel Number
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,847 Posts
The specs for SRT models is 110ft lbs and for all other models is 130ft lbs of torque.
When I put my locks on my wheels I felt 130ft lbs was pretty damn high but did it anyway.
I checked the factory service manual and it has this:
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: 63gearhead

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am going to back them off to 110.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I bought a new winter tire and wheel package Last season and the tire shop had the same question.
I used my dealers service department for reference and was told the TNG wheel torque is same as SRT 110. Confirmed the same with the parts manager. Owners manual and other references will direct you to 130 which is for regular RT models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would be curious to know what the factory used. Don't torques wrenches work in reverse? set it to 110 see if it breaks loose then go to 120 then 130 etc
True. My torque wrenches do work in both directions. Now if we could find a member with a new TNG willing to validate your theory.
 

·
Registered
2018 DD R/T AWD
Joined
·
577 Posts
I would be curious to know what the factory used. Don't torques wrenches work in reverse? set it to 110 see if it breaks loose then go to 120 then 130 etc
Nope, the torque required to break them loose will be higher than the torque used to install them. Static friction is greater than dynamic friction. Here is a generalized diagram for force vs. friction for a simple sliding scenario. Of course in the case of a fastener, once the fastener begins moving, the clamping load either increases or decreases depending on the direction you are turning it. So the curve shape will be different, but the same idea applies:

Rectangle Slope Font Plot Parallel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
Could you place your toque wrench on mark the socket, lug and tire where the handle is loosen with another tool then realign the marks and torque it. That should give you a good idea 110 to 130 should be a decent amount of exta distance in the twist action for that much additional or minimal torque. based on the way the oil filter was applied its probably torqued to 180 from the factory :LOL:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Nope, the torque required to break them loose will be higher than the torque used to install them. Static friction is greater than dynamic friction. Here is a generalized diagram for force vs. friction for a simple sliding scenario. Of course in the case of a fastener, once the fastener begins moving, the clamping load either increases or decreases depending on the direction you are turning it. So the curve shape will be different, but the same idea applies:

View attachment 121389
With a response like that you gotta be an engineer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I was going to say I would not back off a nut to leave it at less torque...I would remove and retighten to spec
Yep. I loosened each lug nut to to “hand loose” then retightened to spec (110)
 
  • Like
Reactions: frictioncircle
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top